Tignon Laws

Tignon (pronounced “tiyon”)- a piece of cloth worn as a turban headdress by Creole women of African ancestry in Louisiana. In 1786 Governor Esteban Rodriguez Miró of Louisiana created laws meant to govern the ways in which African American women were allowed to dress. Due to the fact that black women’s beauty served as too much of a “competition” to that of white women, black women were forced to wrap their hair in a tignon. This was supposed to make them less attractive. Fortunately, the black women of Louisiana turned this head wrap into a fashion and art form.

 1. 19th Century Tignon Wearing Women of Color 2. 1786 Francois Beaucourt, Portrait of Servant Woman 3. Woman in Tignon Selling Fruits & Vegetables 4. Women of Santo Domingo in Tignons

1. 19th Century Tignon Wearing Women of Color 2. 1786 Francois Beaucourt, Portrait of Servant Woman 3. Woman in Tignon Selling Fruits & Vegetables 4. Women of Santo Domingo in Tignons

Source: https://b-womeninamericanhistory19.blogspo...